Five Changes Coming to the Retirement World in 2016

2016 changes

It’s still early in 2016, but big changes are coming in the retirement world, as it’s always changing. As you plan for retirement, it’s important to stay on top of specific changes that can affect your self-directed IRA retirement accounts, regular retirement accounts, Social Security and investment vehicles. These changes could impact your saving strategy:

The new myRA is now available

The myRA is a Roth individual retirement account (IRA) that has no fees, and the government guarantees that it will never lose its value. We talked about myRA’s back in September, and weighed the pros and cons. This is pegged as an ideal option for those who are just getting started on their retirement savings because it’s easy to set up contributions.

The saver’s credit threshold increases

People who make slightly more money might have a better chance qualifying for the saver’s credit in 2016. The limit for adjusted gross income (AGI) increased $250 to $30,750 for single filers, and for married couples filing jointly, the AGI limit rose $500 to $61,500.

Obama’s 2016 budget focuses on retirement

President Obama’s budget proposals include eliminating the special tax break for net unrealized appreciation on retirement accounts, limiting Roth conversions to pretax dollars, putting a cap on retirement savings and more.

While some or all of Obama’s proposals might not happen, these changes could impact what you can do with your retirement accounts.

No more ‘restricted applications’

The “restricted-application” option is being eliminated. Before this new law, couples would file a “restricted application” after reaching full retirement age to receive only spousal Social Security benefits while their own benefit earned delayed credits until age 70. But now, only those who were 62 years old at the end of 2015 qualify.

Rebooting ‘file and suspend’ strategy

Spouses have been using the “file and suspend” strategy to increase their Social Security benefits. Changes are coming by May. As CNBC reports, in order for your spouse to receive a benefit based on your earnings record, you need to actually be receiving benefits as well. Some extensions are possible for those 62 and over.

Tags: , ,

Comments are closed.